We live in a culture and time that weighs the emotive value of love as much more important than the volitional value of love.  It has not always been this way:

“Often the Puritans would decide to get married before they knew who they were going to marry.  They would decide it was time to marry, even though they had no particular person in mind. Edwin Morgan, the historian at Yale put it this way, ‘Puritan love was not so much the cause, as it was the product of marriage. It was the chief duty of husband and wife toward each other, but it did not necessarily form a sufficient reason for marriage. The advice was not that couples should not marry unless they love each other, but that they should not many unless they can love each other.’” [Mark Dever, “The Puritans on Sex.”]